Modeling Arctic Waters

Modeling Arctic Waters

Scientists can model how sea-ice melts, the movement of glaciers, Arctic weather conditions and much more with supercomputers. These models help us understand Arctic trends and help predict the future of climate change.

[ video ] Modeling Ice in the Arctic
[ video ] Quinhagak Drifters
[ video ] Simulating Bering Strait Region Oceanography
[ video ] {upcoming} Blowing Up Models

People: Kate Hedstrom, Seth Danielson, Thomas Weingartner, Andy Mahoney, …

Geologic methane seeping from thawing cryosphere (Marmian Grimes) Permafrost, The Atmosphere
Making sea ice 300 miles from the ocean (Ned Rozell) Sea Ice
Ice restrains the floodgates (Laura Nielsen) The Icy Cryosophere, Sea Ice, Climate Change
Arctic lakes getting a closer look (Ned Rozell) Permafrost, The Atmosphere
Modeling Arctic Waters from the Bering Sea through the Bering Strait to the Arctic Ocean (Liz O’Connell) Computational Science
Glaciologists help with recovery of human remains (Ned Rozell) Arctic Archaeology, The Icy Cryosphere, Glaciers
International Polar Week and Climate Predictions in Ice (Laura Nielsen) Historical Climate, Climate Change
Alaska’s view of the new sea-ice minimum (Ned Rozell) The Icy Cryosphere, Sea Ice
A Portal to Toolik Field Station (Laura Nielsen) Initiatives, Climate Change
Don’t freeze up: the Arctic Ice Watch campaign (Laura Nielsen) The Icy Cryosphere, Sea Ice
Against the odds Antarctic sea ice is growing– here’s why (Laura Nielsen) The Icy Cryosphere, Sea Ice

Polarstern in the Central Arctic (position approx. 83° N, 130° O). One-year thin sea ice predominated in the Arctic in the summer of 2012. The ice cover is permeated by open water areas and melting ponds. / Courtesy: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred Wegener Institute

Polarstern in the Central Arctic (position approx. 83° N, 130° O). One-year thin sea ice predominated in the Arctic in the summer of 2012. The ice cover is permeated by open water areas and melting ponds. / Courtesy: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred Wegener Institute

Modeling Arctic Waters project

Related: Climate Change Watch, Permafrost


One Response to “Modeling Arctic Waters”

Sheldon I. Katchatag on September 5th, 2012 10:54 am:

IMPACT of ‘THICK NORTON Sound Ice on BERING Sea’?:
Beginning in EARLY November,2011, SUB-Zero Temperatures began THICKENING and EXPANDING the extent of the SOUTHERN Norton Sound SHORE-FAST Ice.
-30 TO -40+ SUB-Zero Temperatures during the MOST of DECEMBER, JANUARY, Last HALF of February and MOST of MARCH CONTINUED the THICKENING & EXPANSION of Ice Coverage.
When the SOUTHERN Norton Sound SHORE-FAST Ice FINALLY broke into LARGE, THICK Ice Floes during the LAST Week of JUNE – It was blown into the Mid- to NORTHERN-Bering Sea, MOSTLY Between St. Lawrence and St. Paul.
CHECK St. PAUL’s JULY TEMPERATURES!


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