Charlotte

“Charlotte– The whole analyzer system at first glance looks like a mess of wires and tubing but what it is, is a central analyzer connected to eight different chambers and because that central analyzer is connected by tubing to those eight different chambers it kind of looks like a spider, which is where she gets her name: Charlotte.” – Kathy Kelsey

Charlotte

Small enclosed domes lowered onto sub-Arctic tundra allow scientists in Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta to measure changes in carbon dioxide gas (CO2) concentration over a period of time. Measuring carbon dioxide flux will help the scientific community better calculate impacts of greenhouse gasses.

Ryan Choi: “A large percentage of the earth’s carbon is actually stored below ground in arctic soils. And with increased warming it is hypothesized that a lot more CO2 will be released into the atmosphere. And so these Arctic and sub-Arctic ecosystems are real important stores of below ground carbon. And changes in flooding and changes in off gassing as well as the vegetation above ground could really affect global CO2 concentrations.”

Charlotte greenhouse gas analyzer science equipment climate flux data

Kathy Kelsey, Ryan Choi

Charlotte greenhouse gas analyzer science equippent climate flux data
A component of “Charlotte” alongside Kathy Kelsey’s boots / Frontier Scientists

Charlotte video | Frontier Scientists YouTube

(Charlotte greenhouse gas analyzer science equipment climate flux data)

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Project Summary

Climate Change and Brant Geese in the Y-K Delta

Climate Change and Brant Geese in the Y-K Delta

Climate Change and Brant Geese in the Y-K Delta Warming temperatures create a mismatch in the timing of plant growth and the arrival of migratory birds. Researchers explore the implications of this mismatch in Alaska's Yukon Delta National... Read More >